Is the EU really committed to a digital single market?

The digital single market is a reality that the European Commission is now trying to focus on.

On 6 May 2015, the European Commission published its Digital Single Market Strategy for Europe. The Strategy sets out a total of 16 initiatives under 3 pillars (based upon key areas for action identified by the Commission earlier this year) which lay the groundwork for Europe’s digital future. The three pillars are summarized as follows:

A. Better access for consumers and businesses to online goods and services across Europe
Privacy, Copyright, Telecommunications (satellite and cable in particular), VAT and ending unjustified geo-blocking, including the Spanish legislation preventing news to show on search engines.

B. Creating the right conditions for digital networks and services to flourish
The first point to be addressed is the necessary investment in high-speed and affordable networks to support the development of digital entertainment, online platforms, audiovisual media, cloud computing, Big Data and the Internet of Things.

Cybersecurity and data protection are the two other matters to be looked up in a global context.

C.- Maximising the growth potential of our European Digital Economy
The main two areas of focus are related to the free flow of data and the interoperability of digital public services.

Understanding the EU slow motion on this sort of initiatives and the fact that is already late on this one I have still two serious concerns:

1.- How will the EC ensure a fast track approval by individual member states for the new Directives and Regulations and amendments to the existing ones? The two years framework outlined in the Roadmap seems extremely idealistic.

2.- How does this initiative fit in global and international developments and in particular in the Internet legal and jurisdictional framework?

European Commision Press Release

Leon Fernando del Canto, Barrister at Del Canto- Chambers

The digital single market is a reality that the European Commission is now trying to focus on.

On 6 May 2015, the European Commission published its Digital Single Market Strategy for Europe. The Strategy sets out a total of 16 initiatives under 3 pillars (based upon key areas for action identified by the Commission earlier this year) which lay the groundwork for Europe’s digital future. The three pillars are summarized as follows:

A. Better access for consumers and businesses to online goods and services across Europe
Privacy, Copyright, Telecommunications (satellite and cable in particular), VAT and ending unjustified geo-blocking, including the Spanish legislation preventing news to show on search engines.

B. Creating the right conditions for digital networks and services to flourish
The first point to be addressed is the necessary investment in high-speed and affordable networks to support the development of digital entertainment, online platforms, audiovisual media, cloud computing, Big Data and the Internet of Things.

Cybersecurity and data protection are the two other matters to be looked up in a global context.

C.- Maximising the growth potential of our European Digital Economy
The main two areas of focus are related to the free flow of data and the interoperability of digital public services.

Understanding the EU slow motion on this sort of initiatives and the fact that is already late on this one I have still two serious concerns:

1.- How will the EC ensure a fast track approval by individual member states for the new Directives and Regulations and amendments to the existing ones? The two years framework outlined in the Roadmap seems extremely idealistic.

2.- How does this initiative fit in global and international developments and in particular in the Internet legal and jurisdictional framework?

European Commision Press Release

Leon Fernando del Canto, Barrister at Del Canto Chambers

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